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TranscriptEdit

Text reads: The Mysteries of Life with Tim & Moby.

TIM: Dear Tim & Moby, why do we need to eat and drink? From, cunn15.

The signature on the letter shows that it came via the Internet.

MOBY: Beep

The video changes to show Tim and Moby standing side by side in a room, in front of two windows. A grassy knoll is on the other side of the windows. Tim is wearing a white tee shirt with a graphic of four circles, each with a capital letter in the center of the circle. The top, blue circle has the letter Upper C. Going clockwise, the second circle is red and has the letter Upper H. The next circle is bronze and has the letter Upper N. The last circle is green and has the letter Upper O. As Tim speaks, Moby stands idly by, blinking occasionally.

TIM: Moby can't imagine not wanting to eat and drink. The thing is, we need food and water so that our bodies can function. Chemical reactions are going on in your body all the time. We're made up of lots of different chemicals that react to produce the substances our bodies need for growth and energy. The elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen make up 95 percent of the body’s weight.

The video changes to show the word "ELEMENTS" engulfing the screen.. A blue circle with "Upper C" appears in the upper-left corner of the screen. Under the circle appears the word "carbon". Next to the blue circle, in the upper-right corner, appears a red circle with "Upper H". Under the circle appears the word "hydrogen". A green circle appears in the lower-right corner. The circle has "Upper O" on it, and underneath the circle appears the word "oxygen". Finally, in the lower-left corner appears a bronze circle with "Upper N" on it. Under the circle appears the word "nitrogen".

TIM: We get these elements from the food we eat and the water we drink.

The video changes to show various types of food, including sliced salmon, a bowl of salad, spare ribs, a taco, a hamburger, a pear, a loaf of sliced bread, and a glass of water.

TIM: Everybody knows that we're supposed to drink lots of water; but it's not just because it comes in pretty bottles.

The video changes to show a large, full glass of water. The label "water" appears in the upper-left corner of the screen. A model of the compound Upper H subscript 2 Upper O appears from the right side of the screen and floats across to the left side. The model consists of a green sphere with "Upper O" on the front, and the green sphere has two rods protruding from it, both at 60 degrees. At the end of each rod is a red sphere that has "Upper H" on it.

TIM: Water is good at dissolving substances that your body needs, and it’s involved in all sorts of chemical reactions.

The video changes to show a light blue background representing water. In the foreground, a red formless structure floats from the top center of the screen downward. Halfway down, it starts separating into several smaller pieces. On the right and the left of the screen, air bubbles float upward from the bottom of the screen as the red pieces fall to the bottom.

TIM: Water helps maintain your body temperature and flows through your body carrying nutrients from place to place.

The video changes to show a thermometer on the left side of the screen. On the right half of the screen appears a diagonally striped background of red, orange, and red. In the orange section, blood cells float by.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: In fact, you might be surprised to know that water is the most abundant molecule in the human body!

The video changes to show the Upper H subscript 2 Upper O model—the green sphere with the "Upper O" connects to the two red spheres, each with the letter "Upper H", floating from the center foreground, getting smaller, and resting in the lower-right corner. The background is purple, and a silhouette of a girl appears in the middle of the screen. The silhouette is repetitively lighting up from top to bottom.

TIM: Carbohydrates like sugars and starches are the body's chemical fuel.

The video changes to show a loaf of sliced bread. The label "carbohydrates" appears in the upper-left corner of the screen. On the right of the screen appears a chemical model for carbohydrates. The model shows that each carbohydrate has five units of carbon, one unit of oxygen, and one unit of hydrogen. The carbon and oxygen units are connected in a ring-like formation. The top of the ring starts with a blue circle with a Upper C. Moving clockwise around the ring, the next circle is blue with the letter C, the next circle is green with the letter O, next is a blue circle with the letter Upper C, then another blue circle with a Upper C, and finally another blue circle with a Upper C. Each circle is connected by a rod forming a hexagonal shape. The top circle in the ring is also connected to another circle above it. That circle is red and has the letter Upper H on the front. The red circle then connects to another carbohydrate model at the spot where the green circle with the Upper H exists. Likewise, the first carbohydrate model connects to another carbohydrate between its green circle with the Upper O and the other model's red circle with the Upper H.

TIM: When they're broken down, energy is released, and your body uses it to function. A carbohydrate called glucose is your body's main source of fuel.

The video changes to show a large circle with a dashed outline on the right of the screen. In the circle appears two blue spheres connected by a rod. Each sphere has the letter "Upper C" on it. On the upper-left of the screen appears a shapeless mustard-colored structure. The structure breaks into four pieces as blue star-shaped figures emanate from the rod, connecting the two blue spheres. The connecting rod between the spheres disappears as the star-shaped figures get larger and then contract and expand. The label "glucose" appears in the upper-left corner of the screen.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: Another of the body's sources of energy come from lipids. Lipids are things like fats, oil, and cholesterol.

The video changes to show a dark-purple background. In the foreground, on the right of the screen is a tan, formless structure. The shape represents a lipid. On the left of the screen appears a model for the chemical structure of lipids. The structure starts with two units of oxygen at the top of the screen. The unit on the left, a green sphere with the letter Upper O, has two connecting rods that connect to a carbon molecule or, in this case, a blue sphere with a Upper C. The other oxygen molecule connects to the same carbon molecule, but with only one rod. That carbon molecule connects to another carbon molecule that, in turn, connects via two separate rods to two separate hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are represented by a red sphere with an Upper H. The most previously mentioned carbon molecule also connects to another carbon molecule that connects to two hydrogen molecules. The pattern with the one carbon molecule to two hydrogen molecules continues down the screen.

TIM: They form membranes around cells, store energy, and insulate the body so it doesn't lose too much heat. Some lipids form chemical messengers called hormones.

The video changes to show four squares on the screen. In the upper-left square appears a model of a membrane. The model is an oval shape, with a brown outline and a small gray oval near the upper-right area of the larger oval. The small grey oval has a black outline. In the upper-right square appear five star-shaped figures that are contracting and expanding. In the lower-left corner appears a thermometer. The lower-right square enlarges to fill the screen, and a silhouette of a girl's entire body appears. The silhouette continuously illuminates from top to bottom with the light source, starting from her head. The label "hormones" appears in the upper-right corner of the screen.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: Our bodies need lipids, but too much fat and cholesterol can be bad for you. High cholesterol and fat levels are often linked to heart disease and other health problems.

The video changes to show Tim and Moby standing side by side in the room with the windows behind them. Moby stands idly by, occasionally blinking, while Tim speaks.

TIM: The human body contains thousands of different proteins. Proteins do everything from building your body's structure to controlling chemical reactions.

The video changes to show a dark brown background. A white cube of tofu and a steak appear in the foreground. In the upper-left corner appears the label "proteins". In front of the steak appears a model of the molecular structure of proteins. The model contains four rows of spheres, each with a letter on the front. Each sphere is connected to one or more of the other spheres by a single rod. In the top row, first column is a small sphere with the letter Upper H for hydrogen. The hydrogen molecule is connected to a larger bronze colored sphere, labeled Upper N for nitrogen, in the top row, second column. The nitrogen molecule connects to a carbon molecule, third column and between the first two rows of the first two columns. The carbon molecule is represented by a blue sphere and is labeled with a Upper C. That carbon molecule connects to a second carbon molecule back in the second column, third row. The second carbon molecule connects to an oxygen molecule (a green sphere labeled "Upper O") on its left. The second carbon molecule also connects to a nitrogen molecule below and to the right in the third column between the second and third rows of the first and second columns. The nitrogen molecule connects to a hydrogen molecule to its right in the fourth column. The nitrogen molecule also connects to a carbon molecule below and to the right in the second column, third row. The carbon molecule connects to a hydrogen molecule on its right in the first row. The carbon molecule also connects to another carbon molecule below and to the right in the third column between the third and fourth rows of the first and second columns. This carbon molecule connects to an oxygen molecule on its right in the fourth column. The same carbon molecule also connects to a nitrogen molecule below and to the left in the second column, fourth row. The nitrogen molecule connects to a hydrogen molecule on its left in the first column, fourth row. The nitrogen molecule also connects to a carbon molecule below and to the right in the third column between the fourth and fifth rows of the first and second columns. That carbon molecule then connects to a final carbon molecule below and to the left in the second column, fifth row. The final carbon molecule connects to an oxygen molecule to the right in the first column, fifth row.

TIM: They form the core of the endocrine and immune systems, and they transport small molecules and ions throughout the body.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: Oh, the endocrine system is a system in which chemicals called hormones control a lot of your body's natural functions, like maintaining a constant temperature.

The video returns to show Tim and Moby in the room with the windows behind them.

TIM: Anyway, an enzyme is a type of protein that speeds up chemical reactions in the body.

The video changes to show a light green background. In the center foreground is a dark green shape made up of a circle on the bottom, a trapezoid in the middle, and a square on top. Two more shapes appear. From the lower left of the screen, a purple circle appears, moving toward the shape in the center of the screen. From the lower right of the screen, another shape appears with a light purple square on top, and a medium purple trapezoid on the bottom. The shape is also moving towards the center figure. The two purple shapes continue moving till they both perfectly overlap the shape in the middle of the screen with the square on top, the trapezoid in the center, and the circle on the bottom. The purple shapes then move away from the center shape and off the screen. This time, the light purple square moves off to the upper left, and the dark purple circle and medium purple trapezoid move together to the lower right of the screen.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: Structural proteins like collagen and keratin are found in bones, cartilage, tissues, skin, hair, and nails.

The video changes to show a black background, and in the upper-left corner, the word "collagen" appears. In the upper-right corner, the word "keratin" appears. Under the two words, a skull appears, and then cartilage, a person's finger, and hairs appear.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: Nucleic acids are the blueprints for your body.

The video changes to show a model of D N A. The model is that of a double helix with rods that connect the helixes like ladder rungs. Each rod is made up of two distinct colors. In the upper left corner of the screen appears the label "nucleic acids".

TIM: They use chemical codes to store all the instructions for your body's function and growth.

The video shows a dark blue background. On the background are outlined drawings of human figures, lines with arrows, lines without arrows, and lines of dots that simulate writing. All of the shapes are drawn with dotted lines. The D N A rods appear in the foreground, almost filling the entire screen.

MOBY: Beep?

TIM: If you don’t already know, the molecules D N A and R N A are types of nucleic acids!

The video changes to show Moby holding a beaker and a test tube with liquid in each. Moby is wearing safety goggles. Moby brings the beaker up close to his face and pours the liquid from the test tube into the beaker.

The video shows Tim by himself in front of the window. He is looking in Moby's direction and scrunching his eyes closed. His mouth is agape.

An explosion, followed by Moby's hand flying across the screen and a poof of smoke, all appear from the left corner of the screen.

TIM: Whoops! The body's chemistry is a complicated thing. Luckily, your body automatically regulates it for you. All you have to do is eat right and stay healthy! The End.

Moby holds up a sign that says "Tim is a Koo-Koo Head"

TIM: Hey!!

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