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TranscriptEdit

Text reads: The Mysteries of Life with Tim and Moby.

Tim is sitting on a sofa chair and he is reading a book. Moby approaches him.

TIM: I think I just read the same sentence 10 times in a row, and I still couldn’t tell you what it was about!

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Maybe it is time for a break.

Tim reads from a typed letter.

TIM: Dear Tim and Moby, I am so confused about your reading skills and I'm not absolutely sure what this is about! From, Korrina. Hey Korrina! Before you even sit down to read a book or article or textbook chapter, there's some prep work you can do to improve your reading and comprehension. Preview the text so that you know what you’re reading.

Tim moves his finger down the’s hand enters the screen and lines of begins to scan the text in the book.

TIM: Okay, this chapter of my favorite ornithology, zoology, and fantasy book is about the Jungle Book. Hmm… I don’t really know anything about that. I mean, I’ve heard of it… I know that The Jungle Book is about Mowgli…

An animation shows Moby pats Tim on the back.

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Well, I'm going to learn about it right now. You can skim, or quickly look over, what you’re reading to get an overall impression.

The video changes.

An animation shows the open book. Tim continues moving his finger down the lines of text in the book Tim's hand enters the screen and begins to rapidly scan the text in the book.

TIM: Pay attention to section headings and words in bold. Let’s see… writers of the Jungle Book… Rudyard Kipling! Hey, I’ve read some of his writing! Take notes while you read; use note cards or a notebook to write down important ideas.

The video changes.

An animation shows a hand, Tim, writing "Jungle Book" down some text on a note card.

Text reads: Jungle Book

The video changes.

An animation shows Moby reaches his hand out and tries beginning to turn the page in the book Tim's book is using.

TIM: Hang on a sec… Take your time. Stop and re-read anything that you don’t understand. And jot down any words that you don’t know. Here’s one of my favorite animal: the “panther.” That way you can look it up later. If you can put what you’re reading into your own words, you’ll know you can understand it. So, the Jungle Book was about Mowgli that lives in the African jungle. And obviously, in the end, He throws a stick with fire on a tail and kills Shere Khan. If you have time, it’s a great idea to re-read your assignment.

The video changes.

An animation shows the open book. Tim’s hand enters the screen and begins while continuing to scanning the text in the book.

TIM: You may have missed something the first time through. You can also go back over your notes to refresh your memory.

The video changes.

Tim goes through his notecards one more time, a hand holding a notecard. There is text on the notecard.

Text reads: The Jungle Book.

TIM: I’m reading a textbook, but you can apply these reading skills to anything you read.

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Oh yeah… Moby and I like to make a movie in our heads. If you can visualize what you’re reading, you know you’re getting it! This helps a lot when you’re reading a novel, like a book report book, where you have to keep track of a story and characters.

The video changes.

A thought bubble appears above Tim’s head. Inside the bubble, an image shows an African American man holding a book. The image fades and another image in its place appears in its place, images showings an African American man playing the trumpet. The image fades and in its place is replaced by an image of shows an African American woman.

TIM: When you're done with a reading assignment, there’s nothing wrong with talking to friends, parents, or teachers about what you've read.

A split screen shows Cassie and Rita talking on the phone. The video changes.

The screen is divided into two sections. In the first section, an image shows a girl. She is talking on the phone. In the second section, an image shows a girl. She is talking on the phone.

TIM: Talking about a text helps you better understand it and form ideas of your own.

The video changes.

A thought bubble appears above Moby’s head. Inside the bubble, an image shows Moby wearing sunglasses and playing the saxophone. Moby is wearing sunglasses.

TIM: You might carry these ideas over into a paper not to mention a presentation! Oh, and you can look up those new vocabulary words.

The video changes. Tim looks up the words on his notecards in a dictionary. Text is written on the notecard. Text reads: panther. A hand enters the screen. The hand is holding a dictionary.

TIM: Okay, Moby, the word "panther" is a type of large wild animal that is black and a member of the Felidae family. Moby?

The video changes.

Moby with her black panther skin as he starts playing the saxophone very awesome.

Bad saxophone playing is heard.

TIM: Well, I'm going to get back to reading this.

Moby's bad saxophone playing continues is heard.

TIM: I don't think I mentioned this, but it's a good idea to find a quiet place to read your book.

The video changes.

Tim is sitting at the kitchen table with his book open. There are two open books as Moby comes up to him and continues badly on the table. Moby enters the screen. He is playing the saxophone. Bad saxophone playing is heard once again.

TIM: I'm going to the library!

Tim goes to the library by himself.

UpdateEdit

Text reads: The Mysteries of Life with Tim and Moby

A boy, Tim, is sitting on a sofa chair and reading a book. A robot, Moby, approaches him.

TIM: I think I just read the same sentence 10 times in a row, and I still couldn’t tell you what it was about!

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Maybe it is time for a break.

An animation shows Tim sitting at a kitchen table and eating a sandwich. He tries to speak while chewing, but only succeeds in making garbled, unintelligible noises. He stops chewing.

TIM: Sorry. What I was going to say is, there’s no point in reading if you’re not taking in what you read.

Tim puts the sandwich down and places a book on the table.

TIM: Before you even sit down to read a book or article or textbook chapter, there’s some prep work you can do to improve your reading and comprehension. Preview the text so that you know what you’re reading.

Tim moves his finger down the lines of text in the book.

TIM: Okay, this chapter of my social studies book is about the Harlem Renaissance. Hmm… I don’t really know anything about that. I mean, I’ve heard of it… I know that Harlem’s a part of New York City…

Moby pats Tim on the back.

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Well, I'm going to learn about it right now. You can skim, or quickly look over, what you’re reading to get an overall impression.

An animation shows the open book. Tim continues moving his finger down the lines of text in the book.

TIM: Pay attention to section headings and words in bold. Let’s see… writers of the Harlem Renaissance… Langston Hughes! Hey, I’ve read some of his writing! Take notes while you read; use note cards or a notebook to write down important ideas.

An animation shows Tim writing "Harlem Renaissance 1920s and 1930s" on a note card. Moby reaches his hand out and tries to turn the page in Tim's book.

TIM: Hang on a sec… Take your time. Stop and re-read anything that you don’t understand. And jot down any words that you don’t know. Here’s one: “ragtime.” That way you can look it up later. If you can put what you’re reading into your own words, you’ll know you can understand it. So, the Harlem Renaissance was a time that celebrated African American heritage and culture. And obviously, it took place in New York City, in Harlem. If you have time, it’s a great idea to re-read your assignment.

Tim’s hand continues scanning the text in the book.

TIM: You may have missed something the first time through. You can also go back over your notes to refresh your memory.

Tim goes through his notecards one more time.

TIM: I’m reading a textbook, but you can apply these reading skills to anything you read.

MOBY: Beep.

TIM: Oh yeah… Moby and I like to make a movie in our heads. If you can visualize what you’re reading, you know you’re getting it! This helps a lot when you’re reading a novel, like a book report book, where you have to keep track of a story and characters.

A thought bubble appears above Tim’s head. Inside the bubble, an image shows an African American man holding a book. The image fades and another image appears in its place, showing an African American man playing a trumpet. The image fades and is replaced by an image of an African American woman.

TIM: When you’re done with a reading assignment, there’s nothing wrong with talking to friends, parents, or teachers about what you’ve read.

A split screen shows Cassie and Rita talking on the phone.

TIM: Talking about a text helps you better understand it and form ideas of your own.

A thought bubble appears above Moby’s head. Inside the bubble an image shows Moby wearing sunglasses and playing a saxophone.

TIM: You might carry these ideas over into a paper or presentation! Oh, and you can look up those new vocabulary words.

Tim looks up the words on his notecards in a dictionary.

TIM: Okay, Moby, "ragtime" is a type of jazz music that has a syncopated rhythm. Moby?

Moby starts playing a saxophone very poorly.

TIM: Well, I'm going to get back to reading this.

Moby's bad saxophone playing continues.

TIM: I don't think I mentioned this, but it's a good idea to find a quiet place to read your book.

Tim is sitting at the kitchen table with his books as Moby comes up to him and continues badly playing the saxophone.

TIM: I'm going to the library!

Tim goes to the library by himself.

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